“Don’t You Cry” by Mary Kubica

dyc

I read Mary Kubica’s The Good Girl a while back and really enjoyed it, so her other two novels have been on my list to read for quite some time. I managed to snag Don’t You Cry in a large print edition at my local library. I felt like a speed reader turning those pages with the big words so fast!

Don’t You Cry tells two separate stories for it’s first 80%. Storyline A is that of Quinn, early 20’s, entry-level career, trying to make a life for herself in Chicago. Quinn lives in a somewhat decent apartment in the heart of the city with her roommate, Esther. One groggy morning, after a night out drinking, Quinn wakes up to find Esther missing. While not immediately alarmed, panic begins to bubble up as Esther doesn’t return for several hours. Or the rest of the night. Or the next few days…
Quinn spends the rest of the week desperately trying to find out what happened to Esther and why she has disappeared–did she leave on her own free will, or is she in danger? Is Esther really the sweet, gentle roommate Quinn knows and loves?

Storyline B follows Alex (for the first few chapters I thought he was a girl, damn those unisex names) who is working a dead-end job as a diner dishwasher in his run-down hometown. Alex turned down a college scholarship to stay home to take care of his incoherent alcoholic father. The highlight of his day is delivering the lunch orders to his agoraphobic neighbor. His life is dreadfully dull, until he meets a mysterious, and incredibly odd girl in the diner, who he affectionately names “Pearl.”

Quinn becomes more and more suspicious of Esther, after finding dark clues from her past in the apartment.

Alex becomes more and more fascinated by Pearl’s lunacy, but is blinded by her attention and companionship.

The pieces start falling together as to how these two tales will align, and while I thought I had it all figured out, I definitely didn’t.

This was a quick read, although a little slow to start and get into. Once the suspense started building, I found it engaging with a fairly okay twist at the end.

3.75 out of 5 stars.

Eeeny Meeny by M.J. Arlidge

eeny-meeny

I’ve recently gotten into crime stories, mysteries and thrillers, and M.J. Arlidge is a fantastic new breakout author on the scene. His books follow DI (Detective Inspector, for us Americans) Helen Grace as she leads her police unit through gruesome crimes and battles her own inner demons. There are currently four books in the series, with a fifth releasing stateside next month. I’m working on catching up so I’m ready to read the newest installment when it comes out. So far, two down, two to go.

Eeny Meeny opens with a ghastly scene that grabs your attention right from page one. A couple awakes in an unfamiliar setting, held in captivity, with no way out. They have no food, no water, nothing to keep them warm; a cell complete bare, except for a gun. A phone rings and tells the couple that only one of them will make it out alive–the only way for one to escape is to kill the other. Hooked yet? Yeah, I was too. I was also having nightmarish flashbacks of Saw, but luckily this book never gets quite that gorey.

Similar situations begin popping up all over the city, and DI Grace’s team finds themselves hunting a serial killer who never actually does the killing himself. Along the way, skeletons from DI Grace’s past begins to pop up, a past she has worked hard at burying. She fights to keep her life from interfering with her work, but soon finds it all completely interwoven.

I thought the storyline was exceptionally dark and twisted, the kind that makes you think “what is wrong with this author????” in the best way possible. However, it also never veered into wildly unbelievable territory and stayed fairly realistic (cue, extra creepy.) It did take me some time to figure out the UK vocabulary. After lots of Googling British police lingo and abbreviations, I was able to match the characters up with who would be their equivalent in Law & Order SVU, and finally started to finally understand who was who in the investigative ranks.

I really enjoyed this book, have already finished its sequel, Pop Goes the Weasel, and plan to read The Doll’s House as soon as I can get my hands on a free library copy. This series isn’t for the faint of heart, but I would recommend for someone looking to get into a new, fresh crime collection.

4 out of 5 stars.